My patients come from every walk of life, every stage of life, and with pretty much every circumstance of life. And one thing I have observed — whether I am treating an athlete, an office worker, or a stay-at-home parent — is that the stresses of life can cause just as much mental fatigue in a person as they can cause physical fatigue. In fact, I get just as many requests from people for advice on how they can stay mentally sharp as I do questions about how they can stay physically fit.

Now, the simple advice—the universal advice—is to eat right, avoid excess caffeine and so-called “energy drinks” (which, while they can give a short-term boost, can lead to a foggy brain crash), exercise (which can increase blood and oxygen flow to the brain), and challenge your brain every day with things like reading, crossword puzzles, sudoku, and stimulating conversation. After all, just like your muscles, your brain needs to get a good workout every day to keep it in shape.

But my advice doesn’t end there. My patients tend to be high achievers, always striving to take their minds and bodies to greater levels of health and function. So, I did a deep dive into the science of staying mentally sharp and discovered a nutrient that can help feed the brain.

Citicoline: Brain Cell Food

During my research, I came across a new class of compounds called “nootropics”—substances that promote healthy cognitive function.* And while there are several items in this category, the one that grabbed my attention was Citicoline, mainly because of its benefits and because of its relationship to the essential nutrient Choline and Cytidine, which is a component of a nucleic acid (RNA). When taken as an oral supplement, Citicoline crosses the blood-brain barrier and is converted into Choline and Cytidine, both of which have been shown in research to help with the formation of healthy brain cells.*1

Scientifically speaking, Citicoline is a precursor / building block of phosphatidylcholine, a primary structural component of cell membranes. The membranes on the outside of your brain cells are where cell-to-cell communication takes place through the transmission of bio-electric impulses between adjacent cells. In this sense, Citicoline helps brain cells talk to each other.*

Furthermore, Citicoline supports the body’s production of 3 neurotransmitters: acetylcholine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. These neurotransmitters are involved in brain cell communication and memory.* Dopamine also supports a positive mood.* These effects make Citicoline a key nutraceutical for healthy brain aging.* Citicoline also helps inhibit formation of free radicals in brain cell membranes, which further contributes to healthy brain aging.*

Not Just Any Citicoline

When I give my patients a recommendation for a nutritional supplement, I want them to have the best ingredients available. In this instance, that means Xerenoos® Citicoline. Xerenoos® has over 40 years of use as the premiere version of Citicoline, with 95 human clinical trials to back up its record of safety and effectiveness. Some study highlights include:

  1. Citicoline improves verbal memory in aging – published in the Archives of Neurology.2
  2. Citicoline improves memory performance in elderly subjects – published in Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology.3
  3. Improved Attentional Performance Following Citicoline Administration in Healthy Adult Women – published in Food and Nutrition Sciences.4

With Xerenoos®, I finally have the confidence to offer my patients—and you—my Dr. Redcross Citicoline Cognition Support formula. It’s the simple way to feed your brain and give it help when it comes to overall brain function, memory, focus, and healthy brain aging.* Because after all, your mind needs to be fed properly, just like your body.

1 – Citicoline: Pharmacological and clinical review, 2006 update. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6629277_Citicoline_Pharmacological_and_clinical_review_2006_update. Accessed June 2018.

2 – Citicoline improves verbal memory in aging. Spiers PA, Myers D, Hochanadel GS, Lieberman HR, Wurtman RJ. Arch Neurol. 1996 May;53(5):441-8. Erratum in: Arch Neurol 1996 Oct;53(10):964.

3 – Citicoline improves memory performance in elderly subjects. Alvarez XA, Laredo M, Corzo D, Fernández-Novoa L, Mouzo R, Perea JE, Daniele D, Cacabelos R. Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology. 1997 Apr;19(3):201-10.

4 – Improved Attentional Performance Following Citicoline Administration in Healthy Adult Women. Mcglade, Erin & Locatelli, Allison & Hardy, Julia & Kamiya, Toshikazu & Morita, Masahiko & Morishita, Koji & Sugimura, Yoichiro & Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah. (2012). Food and Nutrition Sciences. 03. 10.4236/fns.2012.36103.

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